Antique Sofreh, Luri Nomads, Luristan, Western Persia. ...

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BM/N1

Utterly charming in its depiction of various birds and goats and a powerful 'tree-of-life' rising up from the underworld, through the earthly world to the world of the spirit. The undyed ivory central panel is woven in plain-weave with the surrounding borders and stylised creatures in knotted-pile. I can only surmise that this odd weaving was made as a dining sofreh where the nomads would sit cross-legged around it at mealtimes and eat the food placed on this sofreh. Nevertheless, it is truly nomadic and would make a fabulous wall-hanging.
1.27m x 1.12m (4' 2" x 3' 8").
SOLD
| $1,931 USD | €1,643 EUR

Antique Torba, Igdyr Turkmen Tribe, Turkmenistan, Central ...

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BM/JS

This handsome little torba (small personal belongings bag) comprises three 'trees' in the central ivory field - symbolising eternal life in Paradise and the 3-level universe, where the roots of the tree are in the under-world; the trunk in the earthly world and the branches in the world of the spirit. Made by the Igdyr Turkmen around the middle of the 19th century, torbas from this group are a relatively rare find today. The Igdyrs are listed amongst the Oguz as early as the 11th century and inhabited the Khorezm Oasis with a proportion of the tribe living in the northern Caspian region. This torba is complete with its plain-weave back, woven in undyed sheep's wool.
84cm x 38cm (2' 9" x 1' 3").
SOLD
| $0 USD | €0 EUR

Antique Tibetan Flint Pouch, Tibet.

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BM/TP

A charming little flint pouch with flint still inside, and made in Tibet during the 19th century.
Size: 9cm x 5cm (3" x 2").
SOLD
| $0 USD | €0 EUR

Antique Vanity-Bag, Qashqa'i Nomads, Fars Province, South-West ...

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BM/EK1

Tiny vanity-bags ('chanteh' in Persian) from the 19th century are now very scarce and rare.
I found this one in Turkey last week - a beautiful small chanteh made by Qashqa'i nomads, in Fars Province, south-west Persia circa 1900. The lozenge in the indigo-blue knotted-pile field contains 'birds-heads' - symbols depicting the guardians of the gates of Paradise and the charming plain-weave back with 'zig-zag shapes which might very well symbolise flowing water.
The knotted face is very fine and the wool is soft and velvety.
Size: 30cm x 26cm (12" x 10").
SOLD
| $0 USD | €0 EUR

Antique Tribal Purse, Qashqa'i - Darrehshuri Nomads, ...

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BM/VK7

This is the cutest little 'khorjin' (mini saddlebags) probably used as a purse because of the small size. It is woven in a technique called 'shesha derma' by Darrehshuri Qashqa'i nomads at the end of the 19th century. Bags made using this shesha derma technique are very rare in todays market-place.
Size: 38cm x 17cm (1' 3" x 7").
SOLD
| $0 USD | €0 EUR

Antique Salt-Bag, Bakhtiari Nomads, Western Persia.

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BM/VK4

This wonderful old 'namakdan' (salt-bag) was woven in soumack technique by Bakhtiari nomads in western Persia during the 3rd quarter of the 19th century. The weave is extremely fine and the tiny highlights of white throughout, is cotton. The base of the bag is in knotted-pile comprising a row of '5s' - a quincunx symbol for warding off evil and protecting the contents of the bag. This is a rare and early example of Bakhtiari work.
Size: 56cm x 49cm (1' 10" x 1' 7").
SOLD
| $0 USD | €0 EUR

Antique Turkmen Engsi, Teke Tribes, Turkmenistan, Central ...

Item Ref
BM/MH

The Engsi had a very important symbolic meaning to the Turkmen. Hung at the entrance to the Turkmen Oy (yurt), facing inwards, it represented the gateway to Paradise. Looking at it as you see it in the photo, the lower panel symbolised the sky-door leading to the central '4 gardens of Paradise'. Once in one of these gardens, the person leaving the earthly world, was spiritually secure. The pentagonal shape at the top is the 'kejebe' - a symbol representing power and fertility to the owner of the rug. This engsi was made by the Teke tribe around 1870-1880 and is in very good condition.
Size: 1.40m x 1.13m (4' 7" x 3' 9").
SOLD
| $2,330 USD | €1,983 EUR

Antique Turkmen Torba, Salor Tribe, Turkmenistan, Central ...

Item Ref
BM/VK1

This beautiful torba was made by Salor Turkmen in Turkmenistan circa 1880 with the use of cochineal-dye wool.
The Salor were once the most powerful, noble and aristocratic Turkmen tribe up until the early 19th century when they were heavily defeated in battle with the ruling Persian Qajars and from this they did not recover. Later on, they were badly defeated again by the Teke and Sariq Turkmen and they moved away from what had been their homeland and eventually settling in the Sarakhs Oasis - a sad end to a most noble tribe. Today, carpets, rugs and trappings which were made by the Salor are highly collectable and rare to acquire.
Size: 1.07m x 0.26m (3' 6" x 10").
SOLD
| $0 USD | €0 EUR

Antique 'Tasheh' (Wheat Sack), Luri-Bakhtiari Tribes, Western ...

Item Ref
BM/T2

'Tashehs' or wheat sacks, were, as the name implies, used for containing wheat and loaded onto the flanks of the pack animals during long migrations. They were made as seen after which the sides and base were brought together and sewn-up with goat-hair, leaving an opening at the top into which the wheat was poured. Each wheat sack had its own identity - a bottle-shape knotted-pile centre which was a totemic symbol for each family. In the 1940s, plastic and gunny sacks arrived in the bazaars of Iran and started to replace the age-old woven wheat sacks. This period saw the demise of the tasheh and today they are rare. This sack retains its original goat-hair hanging loops and as you hopefully might imagine, make most attractive wall-hangings in the home.
Size: 1.30m x 1.02m (4' 3" x 3' 4").
SOLD
| $0 USD | €0 EUR

Antique 'Tasheh' (Wheat Sack), Luri Bakhtiari Tribes, ...

Item Ref
BM/T1

This gorgeous 'tasheh' or wheat sack was made by Luri Bakhtiari nomads during the second quarter of the 20th century and although both sides have been reduced, it will make a most attractive wall-hanging.
Tashehs were totally utilitarian items, used for containing wheat and loaded onto the flanks of pack-animals during long migrations. Woven on ground looms as you see it, the sides and base were brought together and sewn up using goat-hair.
By the 1940s, plastic and gunny sacks had arrived in the bazaars of Iran and these began to replace the age-old tashehs to the point that they simply died out. Today, old tashehs are rare.
Size: 1.12m x 0.87m (3' 8" x 2' 10").
SOLD
| $632 USD | €538 EUR

Antique Double 'Tasheh' (Wheat Sacks), Luri-Bakhtiari Tribes, ...

Item Ref
VS3

It is rare to find a double 'tasheh' (wheat-sack) and this is one I acquired in Iran some 30 years ago and it has just come back to me through the people down-sizing. Illustrated in my book 'Tribal Rugs - Treasures of the Black Tent' under the chapter on the Bakhtiari, this tasheh was made and dated 1945 - the last period in which these beautiful nomadic pieces were made.
In this case, the double tasheh would have been split down the centre and then each individual piece would have the sides and base brought together, sewn up with goat-hair, leaving an opening at the top in which to pour the wheat. The central bottle-shape was always knotted in woollen pile - each one having its own family identity - and symbolically I believe this to represent the bounty of God. Today, tashehs are best hung on the wall to make fabulous decorative wall-hangings - tribal works of art.
Size: 2.20m x 1.02m (7' 3" x 3' 4").
SOLD
| $0 USD | €0 EUR

Antique 'Tasheh' (Wheat Sack), Luri-Bakhtiari Tribes, Western ...

Item Ref
VS2

This wonderful 'tasheh' was made by Luri-Bakhtiari nomads around 1900. Made as a wheat sack ('tasheh' in Persian) on the loom as seen now, both sides would be drawn together, as well as the base, and sewn up with goat hair leaving an opening at the top into which could be poured the wheat. The central part of the tasheh always had a bottle-shape in knotted-pile which I believe was the family motif and symbolically represented the bounty of God.
Sadly, these tashehs were no longer made after the 1940s when plastic and gunny sacks arrived in the Iranian bazaars from the West. Therefore why should a nomad take months to weave such useful sacks when the nomad could barter for plastic sacks! A sad end to a wonderful tribal art. Today, tashehs make attractive and decorative wall-hangings.
Size: 1.07m x 1.00m (3' 6" x 3' 3").
SOLD
| $0 USD | €0 EUR